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NCERT solutions for Class 9 English - Language and Literature chapter 6 - My Childhood

English Beehive for Class 9

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NCERT English Beehive Class 9

English Beehive for Class 9 - Shaalaa.com

Chapter 6: My Childhood

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Page 68]

Q 1 | Page 68

Can you think of any scientists, who have also been statesmen?

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Page 74]

Q 1 | Page 74

Activity:

Find Dhanuskodi and Rameswaram on the map. What language(s) do you think are spoken there? What languages do you think the author, his family, his friends and his teachers spoke with one another?

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Page 75]

Q 1.1 | Page 75

Answer the following question in one or two sentences.
 Where was Abdul Kalam’s house?

Q 1.2 | Page 75

Answer the following question in one or two sentences.

What do you think Dinamani is the name of? Give a reason for your answer.

Q 1.3 | Page 75

Answer the following question in one or two sentences.

Who were Abdul Kalam’s school friends? What did they later become?

Q 1.4 | Page 75

Answer the following question in one or two sentences.

How did Abdul Kalam earn his first wages?

Q 1.5 | Page 75

Answer the following question in one or two sentences.

Had Abdul Kalam earned any money before that? In what way?

Q 2.1 | Page 75

Answer of these question in a short paragraph (about 30 words).

How does the author describe: (i) his father, (ii) his mother, (iii) himself?

Q 2.2 | Page 75

Answer of these question in a short paragraph (about 30 words).

 What characteristics does he say he inherited from his parents?

Q 3.1 | Page 75

“On the whole, the small society of Rameswaram was very rigid in terms of the segregation of different social groups,” says the author.

(i) Which social groups does he mention? Were these groups easily identifiable (for example, by the way they dressed)?

(ii) Were they aware only of their differences or did they also naturally share friendships and experiences? (Think of the bedtime stories in Kalam’s house; of who his friends were; and of what used to take place in the pond near his house.)

(iii) The author speaks both of people who were very aware of the differences among them and those who tried to bridge these differences. Can you identify such people in the text?

(iv) Narrate two incidents that show how differences can be created, and also how they can be resolved. How can people change their attitudes?

Q 3.2 | Page 75
  1. Why did Abdul Kalam want to leave Rameswaram?
  2. What did his father say to this?
  3. What do you think his words mean? Why do you think he spoke those words?

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Pages 75 - 77]

Q 1 | Page 75

Find the sentences in the text where these words occur:

erupt

surge trace undistinguished casualty

Look these words up in a dictionary which gives examples of how they are used.

Now answer the following questions.

1. What are the things that can erupt? Use examples to explain the various meanings of erupt. Now do the same for the word surge. What things can surge?

2. What are the meanings of the word trace and which of the meanings is closest to the word in the text?

3. Can you find undistinguished in your dictionary? (If not, look for the word distinguished and say what undistinguished mean.)

Q 2.1 | Page 76

 Match the phrases in Column A with their meanings in Column B.

  A   B
(i) broke out (a) an attitude of kindness, a readiness to give freely
(ii)

in accordance with

(b) was not able to tolerate
(iii) a helping hand (c) began suddenly in a violent way
(iv) could not stomach (d) assistance
(v) generosity of spirit (e) persons with power to make decisions
(vi) figures of authority (f) according to a particular rule, principle, or system
Q 2.2 | Page 76

Study the words in italics in the sentences below. They are formed by prefixing un – or in – to their antonyms (words opposite in meaning).

• I was a short boy with rather undistinguished looks. (un + distinguished)

• My austere father used to avoid all inessential comforts.(in + essential)

• The area was completely unaffected by the war.(un + affected)

• He should not spread the poison of social inequality and communal intolerance. (in + equality, in+ tolerance)

Now form the opposites of the words below by prefixing un- or in-. The prefix in- can also have the forms il-, ir-, or im- (for example: illiterate –il + literate, impractical –im + practical, irrational – ir+ rational). You may consult a dictionary if you wish.

_____adequate _____acceptable _____regular _____tolerant
____demanding ____active _____true _____permanent
____patriotic ____disputed ____accessible _____coherent
_____logical _____legal _____responsible _____possible
Q 4.1 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

In yesterday’s competition the prizes (give away) by the Principal.

Q 4.2 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

 In spite of financial difficulties, the labourers (pay) on time.

Q 4.3 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

On Republic Day, vehicles (not allow) beyond this point.

Q 4.4 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

 Second-hand books (buy and sell) on the pavement every Saturday.

Q 4.5 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

 Elections to the Lok Sabha (hold) every five years.

Q 4.6 | Page 77

Rewrite the sentence below, changing the verb in bracket into the passive form.

 Our National Anthem (compose) Rabindranath Tagore.

Q 5.1 | Page 77

Rewrite the paragraph below, using the correct form of the verb given in brackets.

How Helmets Came To Be Used in Cricket

Nari Contractor was the Captain and an opening batsman for India in the1960s. The Indian cricket team went on a tour to the West Indies in 1962. In a match against Barbados in Bridgetown, Nari Contractor (seriously injure and collapse). In those days helmets (not wear). Contractor (hit) on the head by a bouncer from Charlie Griffith. Contractor’s skull (fracture). The entire team (deeply concern). The West Indies players (worry). Contractor (rush) to hospital. He (accompany) by Frank Worrell, the Captain of the West Indies Team. Blood (donate) by the West Indies players. Thanks to the timely help, Contractor (save). Nowadays helmets (routinely use) against bowlers.

Q 5.2 | Page 77

Rewrite the paragraph below, using the correct form of the verb given in brackets.

Oil from Seeds

Vegetable oils (make) from seeds and fruits of many plants growing all over the world, from tiny sesame seeds to big, juicy coconuts. Oil (produce) from cotton seeds, groundnuts, soya beans and sunflower seeds. Olive oil (use) for cooking, salad dressing etc. Olives (shake) from the trees and (gather) up, usually by hand. The olives (ground) to a thick paste which is spread onto special mats. Then the mats (layer) up on the pressing machine which will gently squeeze them to produce olive oil.

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Page 78]

Q 1 | Page 78

Here is a topic for you to

1. think about;

2. give your opinion on.

Find out what other people think about it. Ask your friends/seniors/parents to give you their opinion.

‘Career Building Is the Only Goal of Education.’

Or

‘Getting a Good Job Is More Important than Being a Good Human Being.’

You can use the following phrases

(i) while giving your opinion:

• I think that...

• In my opinion...

• It seems to me that…

• I am of the view that...

• As far as I know...

• If you ask me...

(ii) saying what other people think:

• According to some...

• Quite a few think...

• Some others favour...

• Thirty per cent of the people disagree...

• Fifty per cent of them strongly feel...

(iii) asking for others’ opinions:

• What do you think about...

• What do you think of...

• What is your opinion about...

• Do you agree...

• Does this make you believe...

Chapter 6: My Childhood solutions [Page 79]

Q 1 | Page 79

Think and write a short account of what life in Rameswaram in the 1940s must have been like. (Were people rich or poor? Hard working or lazy? Hopeful of change, or resistant to it?)

Chapter 6: My Childhood

NCERT English Beehive Class 9

English Beehive for Class 9 - Shaalaa.com

NCERT solutions for Class 9 English - Language and Literature chapter 6 - My Childhood

NCERT solutions for Class 9 English - Language and Literature chapter 6 (My Childhood) include all questions with solution and detail explanation. This will clear students doubts about any question and improve application skills while preparing for board exams. The detailed, step-by-step solutions will help you understand the concepts better and clear your confusions, if any. Shaalaa.com has the CBSE English Beehive for Class 9 solutions in a manner that help students grasp basic concepts better and faster.

Further, we at Shaalaa.com provide such solutions so that students can prepare for written exams. NCERT textbook solutions can be a core help for self-study and acts as a perfect self-help guidance for students.

Concepts covered in Class 9 English - Language and Literature chapter 6 My Childhood are Reading, Writing, Grammer.

Using NCERT Class 9 solutions My Childhood exercise by students are an easy way to prepare for the exams, as they involve solutions arranged chapter-wise also page wise. The questions involved in NCERT Solutions are important questions that can be asked in the final exam. Maximum students of CBSE Class 9 prefer NCERT Textbook Solutions to score more in exam.

Get the free view of chapter 6 My Childhood Class 9 extra questions for English - Language and Literature and can use Shaalaa.com to keep it handy for your exam preparation

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