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CBSE solutions for Class 9 English - Communicative chapter 2 - The Brook

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Chapters

CBSE Class 9 English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English

Class 9 English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English - Shaalaa.com

Chapter 2: The Brook

Exercise

CBSE solutions for Class 9 English - Communicative Chapter 2 Exercise [Pages 57 - 62]

Exercise | Q 1 | Page 57

Can you match the following?
(a) Something that lives for one year                          biennial
(b) Something that lives for about two years              perennial
(c) Something that lives for more than two years        annual

Exercise | Q 2 | Page 57

Here is a list of a few things. Can you tell how long each of them can live /exist?
(a) a dog
(b) an elephant
(c) a tree
(d) a human being
(e) a star
(f) a mountain
(g) a river

Exercise | Q 3 | Page 57

The poem is about a brook. A dictionary would define a brook, as a stream or a
small river. Read the poem silently first. After the first reading, the teacher will
make you listen to a recording of the poem. What do you think the poem is all
about?
I come from haunts of coot and hern;
I make a sudden sally
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorpes, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.

Till last by Philip's farm I flow
10 To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever.

I chatter over stony ways,
In little sharps and trebles,
15 I bubble into eddying bays,
I babble on the pebbles.


With many a curve my banks I fret
By many a field and fallow,
And many a fairy foreland set
20 With willow-weed and mallow.

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever.


25 I wind about, and in and out,
With here a blossom sailing,
And here and there a lusty trout,
And here and there a grayling,


And here and there a foamy flake
30 Upon me, as I travel
With many a silvery waterbreak
Above the golden gravel,

And draw them all along, and flow
To join the brimming river
35 For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever.


I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
I slide by hazel covers
I move the sweet forget-me-nots
40 That grow for happy lovers.


I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
Against my sandy shallows.


45 I murmur under moon and stars
In brambly wildernesses;
I linger by my shingly bars;
I loiter round my cresses;


And out again I curve and flow
50 To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever.
About the Poet
Lord Tennyson (1809-92) was born in Lincolnshire. Poet Laureate for over 40 years, Tennyson is representative of the Victorian age. His skilled craftsmanship and noble ideals retained a large audience for poetry in an age when the novel was engrossing more and more readers. Tennyson's real contribution lies in his shorter poems like The Lady of Shallot, The Princess, Ulysses, The Palace of Art etc. His fame rests on his perfect control of sound, the synthesis of sound and meaning, and the union of visual and musical.

Exercise | Q 4 | Page 59

After reading the poem answer the following questions.
The poet has used a number of words which indicate 'movement' and 'sound'. Working
with your partner make a list of these words from the poem and complete the web chart.

(c.) A word or a combination of words, whose sound seems to resemble the sound it
denotes (for example: "hiss", "buzz", "etc.) is called onomatopoeia. From the words that
you have filled in the blurbs above point out these words.

Exercise | Q 5 | Page 60

The following is a flow chart showing the course of the brook. Can you fill in the
blank spaces with help from the phrases given below?

a) passes under fifty bridges; b) comes from the place where coots and herons live;
c) passes lawns filled with flowers; d) crosses both fertile and fallow land; e) goes
through wilderness full of thorny bushes

Exercise | Q 6.1 | Page 61

On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions
by ticking the correct choice.

 The message of the poem is that the life of a brook is ___________.

  • temporary

  • short-lived

  • eternal

  • momentary

Exercise | Q 6.2 | Page 61

On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions
by ticking the correct choice.

The poet draws a parallelism between the journey of the brook with ___________.

  • the life of a man

  •  the death of man

  •  the difficulties in a man’s life

  •  the endless talking of human beings

Exercise | Q 6.3 | Page 61

On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice

 The poem is narrated in the first person by the brook. This figure of speech is

  •  Personification

  • Metaphor

  • Simile

  • Transferred epithet

Exercise | Q 7.01 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:
How does the brook ‘sparkle’?

Exercise | Q 7.02 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

Bicker’ means ‘to quarrel’. Why does the poet use this word here?

Exercise | Q 7.03 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

How many hills and bridges does the brook pass during its journey?

Exercise | Q 7.04 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

Where does it finally meet the river?

Exercise | Q 7.05 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

Why has the word ‘chatter’ been repeated in the poem?

Exercise | Q 7.06 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

With many a curve my banks I fret’—What does the poet mean by this statement?

Exercise | Q 7.07 | Page 62

Answer the following questions: ‘

I wind about, and in and out’. What kind of a picture does this line create in your mind?

Exercise | Q 7.08 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

Name the different things that can be found floating in the brook.

Exercise | Q 7.09 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

What does the poet want to convey by using the words ‘steal’ and ‘slide’?

Exercise | Q 7.1 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

The poem has many examples of alliteration. List any five examples.

Exercise | Q 7.11 | Page 62

Answer the following questions:

‘I make the netted sunbeam dance’. What does ‘the netted sunbeam’ mean? How does it dance?

Exercise | Q 7.12 | Page 62

Answer the following question.

What is a 'refrain' in a poem? What effect does it create?

Exercise | Q 8 | Page 62

c
I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever
(a) Who does ‘I’ refer to in the given lines?
(b) How does it ‘chatter’?
(c) Why has the poet used the word ‘brimming’? What kind of a picture does it create?
(d) Explain the last two lines of the stanza.

Exercise | Q 9 | Page 62

Identify the rhyme scheme of the poem.

Exercise | Q 10 | Page 62

The poem is full of images that come alive through skilful use of words. Describe
any two images that appeal to you the most, quoting the lines from the poem.

Exercise | Q 11 | Page 62

The brook appears to be a symbol for life. Pick out examples of parallelism
between life and the brook from the poem.

Exercise | Q 12 | Page 62

This poem describes the journey of a stream from its place of origin to the river that it joins. The poem has been written in the form of an autobiography where the brook relates its experiences as it flows towards the river. In Literature such a device by which an inanimate object is made to appear as a living creature is called Personification. Just as the brook has been personified in this poem, write a poem on any inanimate object making it come alive. You could begin with a poem of 6-8 lines. The poem should have a message. Maintain a rhyme scheme. Try and include similes, metaphors, alliteration etc. to enhance the beauty of the poem. You could write a poem on objects such as the candle/a tree/a rock/the desert etc.
This could be given as a homework activity. The teacher could read out some of the poems in the class and display the others.

Chapter 2: The Brook

Exercise

CBSE Class 9 English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English

Class 9 English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English - Shaalaa.com

CBSE solutions for Class 9 English - Communicative chapter 2 - The Brook

CBSE solutions for Class 9 English - Communicative chapter 2 (The Brook) include all questions with solution and detail explanation. This will clear students doubts about any question and improve application skills while preparing for board exams. The detailed, step-by-step solutions will help you understand the concepts better and clear your confusions, if any. Shaalaa.com has the CBSE Class 9 English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English solutions in a manner that help students grasp basic concepts better and faster.

Further, we at Shaalaa.com provide such solutions so that students can prepare for written exams. CBSE textbook solutions can be a core help for self-study and acts as a perfect self-help guidance for students.

Concepts covered in Class 9 English - Communicative chapter 2 The Brook are Literature Textbook and Extended Reading Text, Writing and Grammar, Reading.

Using CBSE Class 9 solutions The Brook exercise by students are an easy way to prepare for the exams, as they involve solutions arranged chapter-wise also page wise. The questions involved in CBSE Solutions are important questions that can be asked in the final exam. Maximum students of CBSE Class 9 prefer CBSE Textbook Solutions to score more in exam.

Get the free view of chapter 2 The Brook Class 9 extra questions for English - Communicative and can use Shaalaa.com to keep it handy for your exam preparation

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