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Western Music (Theory) Class 12 ISC (Arts) CISCE Topics and Syllabus

Academic year:

Units and Topics

Syllabus

100 Vocal Music

A. Explanation and definition of the following:

1. Production, Transmission and reception of Sounds, Volume, Pitch, and Timbre.

Relation between frequency and length of wire vis-a-vis wire tension.

2. Type of Ragas: Purva, Uttar, Sandi-Prakash, Shudha, Chhayalag, Sankirana.

3. Forms of composition: Dhrupad, Dhamar and their division in to Sathai, Antra, Alap, Tan, Meend, Andolan, Gamak, Kan.

4. Sangeet:

(i) Two systems of Indian classical music.

(ii) Division of twenty two shruties among seven notes.

(iii)Formation of "That" out of Saptak.

(iv) Classification of Ragas among "Thats".

(v) Relationship between Vadi Swar and time of Raga.

(vi) Time Table of Raga.

5. Laya: Drut, Vilambit and Madhya Laya.

B. Complete theory of the following Ragas with:

1. Special reference to their notes, Aroh, Avroh, Pakar Vadi, Samvadi, time etc.

(i) Rag Asawari (ii) Rag Khamaj (iii) Rag Kafi (iv) Rag Bhairvi.

2. General Knowledge of the following Ragas:

(i) Rag Bageshwari, (ii) Rag Malkauns

3. Notation of the following Talas in Dugun and Chaugun Laya:

(i) Chartal (ii) Tivra Tal (iii) Zhaptal (iv) Kahrva.

4. Notation of note combinations, "Khyal" with Alap & Tan (Any Indian system of notation can be adopted).

5. Identification of Ragas by written note- combination

6. Comparison and contrast between Ragas.

7. Brief History of Indian Music.

8. Contribution of the following musicians:

(i) Adarang, (ii) Fiyaz Khan, (iii) Bade Ghulam Ali Khan (iv) Dagar Brothers, (v) Inayat Khan, (vi) Allaudin Khan.

9. Essay of general or topical interest on music and allied subject.

200 Instrumental Music

A. Explanation and Definition of the following:

1. Production, transmission and reception of Sound, Volume, Pitch and Timbre.

Relation between frequency and length of wire vis-a-vis wire tension.

2. Types of Ragas: Poorva, Uttar, Sandhi- Prakash, Shuddha, Chhayalag, Sankirna.

3. Meend, Andolan, Gamak, Kan.

4. Sangeet:

(i) Two main systems.

(ii) Division of twenty-two shruties among seven notes.

(iii) Placement of Swaras on specific shruties.

(iv) Formation of "That" out of Saptak.

(v) Classification of Ragas among "Thats".

(vi) Relationship between vadi and time of Ragas.

(vii) Time of Ragas.

5. Laya: Drut, Madhya, Vilambit, Athgun Laya.

B. 1. Complete theory of the following Ragas with special reference to their notes, Aroh, Avroh, Pakar, Vadi, Samvadi time etc. and special emphasis on their Ansh, Challan and Nayas Swaras:

(i) Rag Asawari (ii) Rag Khamaj (iii) Rag Bhairavi (iv) Rag Kafi.

2. General knowledge of the following Ragas:

(i) Rag Bageshwari (ii) Rag Malkauns.

C. Notation of the following Tals in Dugun and Chaugun Laya:

(i) Chartal (ii) Tivra (iii) Zhaptal (iv) Kaharva.

D. Notation of note combination. Gat with Alap, Tora, Jhala (Any System of notation can be adopted).

E. Identification of Ragas by written notes combination.

F. Comparison and contrast between Ragas.

G. Brief history of Indian Music.

H. Contribution of the following Musicians:

(i) Adarang (ii) Fiyaz Khan (iii) Bade Ghulam Ali Khan (iv) Dagar Brothers (v) Inayat Khan (vi) Allauddin Khan.

I. Essay of general or topical interest on music and allied subjects.

J. Explanation/Definition of the following:

Chal Achal That, Zamzama, Murki, Khatka, Krintan, Kampan.

K. Brief history and origin of musical instruments.

300 Instrumental Music-percussion (Tabla)

A. Contribution of the following Musicians:

(i) Adarang (ii) Fiyaz Khan (iii)Bade Ghulam Ali Khan (iv) Dagar Brothers (vi) Allauddin Khan

B. Essay of general or topical interest on music and allied subjects.

C. Brief history of Indian music.

D. Five Pranas of Tal and explanation thereof:

(i) Grah (Sam, Visham, Atit, Anaghat)

(ii) Jati (Chatasra, Tisra, Misra, Khand, Sankirna)

(iii) Yati

(iv) Prastar

E. Explanation of the following:

(i) Sath (ii) Tihai (Damdar/Bedam) (iii) Ga (iv) Kayada (v) Palta (vi) Rela (vii) Laggi (viii) Lar

F. Complete Tal notation of the following Tals: (i) Jhaptal (ii) Dadra (iii) Tilwara (iv) Dhamar (vi) Jhoomra

G. Tal rotation of Kayada, Palta, etc., with clear indication of Sam, Tali, Khali, Vibhag, etc.

400 Western Music

Part A: Aural Tests (candidates will be required to write all six Tests). This will be assessed by a Visiting Examiner appointed locally and approved by the Council.

1. Candidates will be required to write on a monotone, pre-fixing the necessary time signature, a short rhythmical passage beginning on the first beat of a bar. Compound time will not be included. After indicating the speed at which the pulse of the music moves, the Examiner may play the passage twice. After a short interval, he will play it a third and a fourth time.

2. Candidates will be required to write from dictation a short melodic phrase, beginning on the first beat of a bar, in either a major or a minor key. Before playing the passage, the Examiner will indicate the speed at which the pulse of the music moves. The key will be named, and the keynote and tonic chord sounded. The phrase will then be played once throughout. It will then be played twice in sections, at short intervals of time, and finally the phrase will be repeated in its entirety.

3. Candidates will be required to describe (e.g. 'perfect 5th') intervals which are diatonic in major keys. Two such intervals will be given without the sounding of the keynotes. Each interval will be played twice.

4. Candidates will be required to recognise and name any of the following cadences - perfect, imperfect (half - close), plagal, interrupted - occurring in a musical example in a major or a minor key played by the Examiner. After the tonic chord has been sounded, the whole musical sentence will be played through three times, with due deliberation, at short intervals.

5. Candidates will be required to recognise the three principal chords of a major or a minor key (in root position and in first and second inversion) as played by the Examiner in a continuous musical phrase in a definite key. The phrase containing the given chords will begin with a chord in root position. It will be played four times at a reasonably slow pace, and, before each playing, the tonic chord will be sounded.

6. Candidates will be required to recognise and name simple changes of key. Three examples will be given, each starting from the same tonic key. Three examples will be given, each starting from the same tonic key, and containing one modulation only. Modulations will be limited to the dominant, sub-dominant, and relative major or minor keys. After the key has been named and the tonic chord has been sounded, each of the three examples will be played through twice.

The test will not necessarily contain examples of modulations of three different keys; the same keys recur.

A candidate will be at liberty to write down his answers to a particular test at any stage.

Part B: (One paper of three hours) Candidates will be required to answer five questions: two from Section A, two from Section B and the remaining question from either Section A or Section B.

SECTION A

(i) Harmony, etc. Four-parts chords formed on all degrees of major and minor scales. First the second inversions, the dominant seventh chord and its inversions, modulation to related keys and the simple use of unessential notes. The tests may take the form of harmonization of a melody in four vocal parts or in simple pianoforte style, the working of a figured on unfigured bass, or the construction of a phrase on a given harmonic basis. The addition of a melody, above or below a given melody, the writing of a melody to given words, or the completion of a melody of which the beginning is given. Analysis of the rhythmic structure of a melody, phrasing, etc. Analysis of harmonic progressions including modulations, in a straightforward passage.

SECTION B

Prescribed Works:

Beethoven, Symphony No. 2 in major op 36 and one of the following:

(a) Bach, Prelude and Fugue No. 16 in G minor, Book I.

(b) Schubert "Erl Kenig" (The Erl King).

(c) Caesar Frank: the last movement from the violin and piano sonata.

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