ISC (Science) ISC Class 12 - CISCE Important Questions for English Literature

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English Literature
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Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:

In Act V of the play The Tempest, Prospero greets Gonzalo first because ______.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:

At the end of Act III, Scene III of the play The Tempest, Gonzalo urges the other Lords to follow the "three men of sin" because ______.

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Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:

In Act III, Scene II of the play, The Tempest, Stephano threatens to tie Trinculo to the next tree because ______.

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Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:

In the short story, The Sound Machine, Dr. Scott thought Klausner was ill when Klausner rang up the doctor because ______.

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Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:

Towards the end of the story B. Wordsworth, the poet told the boy to never visit him because ______.

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Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Complete the following sentence by providing a reason:
In the short story, To Build a Fire, the fire built by the man under the tree was extinguished because ______.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [3] Reading
Concept: Reading

Choose two of the passages (a) to (c) and answer briefly the questions that follow: 

Benedick: I can see yet without spectacles, and I see no such matter. There's her cousin, she were not possessed with a fury, exceeds her as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December. But I hope you have no intent to turn husband, have you?

Claudio: I would scarce trust myself though I had sworn the contrary if I Hero would be my wife.

(i) Whom is Benedick referring to in the above lines? 
(ii) Benedick says: 'I see no such matter.' What does he mean by it?
(iii) Explain the lines:

"There's her cousin, she was not possessed with a fury, exceeds her as much in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December". 
(iv) What does the comparison of Beatrice with May suggest about Benedick?
(v) What does Claudio mean by 'sworn the contrary'? 
(vi) Give the meaning of the following words as they are used in the context of the passage: possessed; fury; intent 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Don John: Come, let us to the banquet
                  [Exeunt all but Claudio] 

Claudio: Thus answer 1 in name of Benedick,
But hear this ill news with the ears of Claudio. 'Tis certain so; the prince woos for himself. Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love. Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues. Let every eye negotiate for itself, And trust no agent; for beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood. This is an accident of hourly proof, Which I Mistrusted not. Farewell, therefore, Hero.
[Enter Benedick] 

Benedick: Count Claudio?

Claudio: Yea, the same. 

(i) Where are the speakers? Describe Claudio's state of mind?
(ii) What has Don John just revealed to Claudio? 
(iii) Explain the lines:

"Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues.
Let every eye negotiate for itself,
And trust no agent;"
(iv) How does Don John succeed in conveying his thoughts to Claudio? What is his intention in doing so? 
(v) Why is 'beauty' said to be a 'witch'? Which aspect of Claudio is seen here? 
(vi) Give the meanings of the following words as they are used in the context of the passage: ill; save; office; 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Don John:

Fie, fie, they are not to be nam'd my lord, not to speak of, There is not chastity enough in language Without offence to utter them. Thus, pretty lady, I am sorry for thy much misgovernment. 

Claudio:

O, Hero! What a Hero hadst thou been If half thy outward graces had been plac'd About thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart! But fare thee well, most foul, most fair; farewell Thou pure impiety and impious purity For thee I'll lock up all the gates of love, And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm, And never shall it more be gracious. 

(i) Where are the speakers? What leads Claudio to speak in this manner? 
(ii) What are the charges levelled against Hero by Don Pedro? 
(iii) Explain the lines:

"What an I lero hadst thou been If half thy outward graces had been plac'd About thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart!" 
(iv) What are the immediate reactions of Leonato and Hero to Claudio's words? 
(v) What impressions do we form about Leonato in this scene? 
(vi) Give the meanings of the following words as they are used in the context of the passage: misgovernment; impiety; conjecture 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Choose two of the passages (a) to (c) and answer briefly the questions that follow:

Raina :

Come away from the window (She takes him firmly back to the middle of the room. The moment she releases him he turns mechanically towards the window again. She seizes him and turns him back, exclaiming) Please! (He becomes motionless, like a hypnotized rabbit, his fatigue gaining fast on him. She releases him, and addresses him patronizingly). Now listen. You must trust to our hospitality. You do not yet know in whose house you are. I am a Petkoff. 

The Man: A pet what? 

Raina : [rather indignantly] I mean that I belong to the family of the Petkoffs, the richest and best known in our country. 

The Man: Oh yes, of course. I beg your pardon. The Petkoffs, to be sure. How stupid of me! 

Raina: You know you never heard of them until this moment. How can you stoop to pretend! 

The Man: Forgive me. I'm too tired to think, and the change of subject was too much for me. Don't scold me.

(i) Why did the man keep turning to the window? 
(ii)
Which examples of the social superiority of the Petkoff's does Raina give the man?
(iii)
Which opera does Raina mention? With whom does she compare herself? What does this tell you about her? 
(iv)
In Raina's opinion, what should the man have done instead of threatening her? 
(v)
What does the man tell Raina about his father? Why does he do so? 
(vi) 
What does the man do at the end of the scene? 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Sergius:

Louka! (she stops and looks defiantly at him) A gentleman has no right to hurt a woman under any ` circumstances. [with profound humility, uncovering his head]  beg your pardon. 

Louka:

That sort of apology may satisfy a lady. Of what use is it to a servant? 

Sergius :

[rudely crossed in his chivalry, throws it off with a bitter laugh, and says slightingly) Oh! Do you wish to be paid for the hurt? [He puts on his shako, and takes some money from his pocket].

Louka :

[her eyes filling with tears in spite of herself] No: I want my hurt made well.

Sergius : [sobered by her tone] I low?

(i) Why does Sergius ask Louka's pardon? 
(ii) Why had he hurt her? 
(iii) Why does Louka remind Sergius that she is a servant? 
(iv) Why do Louka's eyes fill with tears? 
(v) How does Louka want her hurt made well? 
(vi) How does Sergius react to the suggestion 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Raina :

[timidly] Nine thousand hotels? 

Bluntschli :

Hotels! Nonsense. If you only knew! Oh, it's too ridiculous. Excuse me: I must give my fellow orders about starting. [He leaves the room hastily, with the documents in his hand]. 

Louka :

[knowing instinctively that she can annoy Raina by disparaging Bluntschli] He has not much heart, that Swiss. He has not a word of grief for his poor father. 

Raina :

[bitterly] Grief! A man who has been doing nothing but killing people for years! What does he care about? What does any soldier care about? [She goes to the door, restraining her tears with difficulty].

Louka :

Major Saranoff has been fighting too, and he has plenty of heart left. [Raina, at the door, draws herself up haughtily and goes out].

(i) What news has Bluntschli just received? 
(ii) What makes Raina ask, `Nine thousand hotels'? 
(iii) Why is Bluntschli in such a hurry to leave? What does Louka comment about him? 
(iv) Why is Raina upset with Bluntschli? 
(v) Why in your opinion, does Louka compare Bluntschli to Sergius? What does she comment when Raina leaves the room?
(vi)  Who enters the room at this point? What news does he give Louka? 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Referring closely to the play, trace Don John's plots against Claudio and Don Pedro from their earliest beginnings. How do the plots end? 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Shakespeare's minor characters play an important part in the development of the plot. What purpose do Dogberry, Verges and the Company of the Watch serve in the play Much Ado About Nothing

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Referring closely to specific instances in the play 'Arms and the Man', discuss how Shaw presents class distinctions and social snobbery. 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Sergius tells Bluntschli in the play "you're not a man, you're a machine." Do you agree with Sergius' assessment of Blunts ii? Give your views.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

With close reference to the novel Ivanhoe discuss how the central plot revolves around the conflicts and tensions between the Normans and the Saxons. 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

The character of King Richard I is presented in Ivanhoe not only with all his admirable qualities but also with his shortcomings. Elaborate with close reference to the text.

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Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Walter Scott appears sympathetic to Isaac's troubles. How does Scott highlight the treatment given to Jews through the character of Isaac? 

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Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills

Referring closely to the essay Unbirthday and Other Presents, discuss why E V Lucas feels that `unbirthday‘ gifts are better than the regular gifts people give. 

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [4] Writing
Concept: Writing Skills
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