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CBSE (Science) Class 12 - CBSE Important Questions for History

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Read the source given below and answer the questions that follow.

“There cannot be any divided loyalty”

Govind Ballabh Pant argued that in order to become loyal citizens people had to stop focusing only on the community and the self: For the success of democracy one must train himself in the art of self-discipline. In democracies, one should care less for himself and more for others. There cannot be any divided loyalty. All loyalties must exclusively be centred around the State. If in a democracy, you create rival loyalties, or you create a system in which any individual or group, instead of suppressing his extravagance, cares nought for larger or other interests, then democracy is doomed.

  1. How did G.B Pant encourage citizens to make a unified nation?
  2. Why did he urge citizens for loyal towards nation?
  3. How was loyalty considered the base of the social pyramid?
Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.02] Kings, Farmers and Towns: Early States and Economies
Concept: The Earliest States

Describe the role of Dr BR Ambedkar in the Constituent Assembly of India.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.03] Kinship, Caste and Class: Early Societies
Concept: Kinship and Marriage: Many Rules and Varied Practices

Abul Fazal describes the ideal of Sulh- i -Kul (absolute peace) as the cornerstone of Akbar enlightened rule”. Support the statement with few examples.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.09] Kings and Chronicles: the Mughal Courts
Concept: The Mughals and Their Empire

‘The officer corps of the Mughals were described as bouquet of flowers held together by loyalty to the emperor.’ Justify the statements with suitable arguments

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.09] Kings and Chronicles: the Mughal Courts
Concept: The Mughals and Their Empire

Read the source given below and answer the questions that follow.

The flight of the written word

In Abu’l Fazl’s words:

The written word may embody the wisdom of bygone ages and may become a means to intellectual progress. The spoken word goes to the heart of those who are present to hear it. The written word gives wisdom to those who are near and far. If it was not for the written word, the spoken word would soon die, and no keepsake would be left us from those who are passed away. Superficial observers see in the letter a dark figure, but the deep sighted see in it a lamp of wisdom (chirag-i shinasai ). The written word looks black, notwithstanding the thousand rays within it, or it is a light with a mole on it that wards off the evil eye. A letter (khat) is the portrait of wisdom; a rough sketch from the realm of ideas; a dark light ushering in day; a black cloud pregnant with knowledge; speaking though dumb; stationary yet travelling; stretched on the sheet, and yet soaring upwards.

  1. Why were words considered as the lamp of wisdom?    
  2. How has Abul Fazal related words with knowledge?    
  3. How did Abul Fazal refer to the difference between a ‘common viewer's observation’ and the ‘observation of a learned person?    
Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.09] Kings and Chronicles: the Mughal Courts
Concept: The Ideal Kingdom

Critically analyse the Fifth Report which was submitted to the British Parliament in 1813.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.1] Colonialism and the Countryside: Exploring Official Archives
Concept: Bengal and the Zamindars

Examine the policies adopted by the British towards Paharias during 18th century.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.1] Colonialism and the Countryside: Exploring Official Archives
Concept: Bengal and the Zamindars

Rumours and Prophecies played a part in moving people to action.’ Explain the statement in the context of the Revolt of 1857.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.11] Rebels and the Raj: 1857 Revolt and Its Representations
Concept: Awadh in Revolt

Describe the role of any six prominent leaders of northern India who fought against the British in the Revolt of 1857.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.11] Rebels and the Raj: 1857 Revolt and Its Representations
Concept: Awadh in Revolt

On the same outline map of India, a place related to the centres of the Revolt of 1857 is marked as A. Identify it and write its name on the line drawn near them.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.11] Rebels and the Raj: 1857 Revolt and Its Representations
Concept: Pattern of the Rebellion

Why have many scholars written the months after Independence as being Gandhiji's "finest hours? Explain.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.13] Mahatma Gandhi and the Nationalist Movement: Civil Disobedience and Beyond
Concept: A Leader Announces Himself

Quit India movement was genuinely a mass movement bringing into its ambit hundreds of thousands of ordinary Indians. Elucidate the statement with suitable examples.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.13] Mahatma Gandhi and the Nationalist Movement: Civil Disobedience and Beyond
Concept: Knowing Gandhi

‘Gandhiji had mobilized a wider discontentment against the British rule in the Salt Satyagraha.’ Elucidate the statement with suitable examples

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.13] Mahatma Gandhi and the Nationalist Movement: Civil Disobedience and Beyond
Concept: The Salt Satyagraha a Case Study

On the given political outline map of India, locate and label the following with the appropriate symbol:

The place where Gandhiji withdrew Non-Cooperation Movement.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.13] Mahatma Gandhi and the Nationalist Movement: Civil Disobedience and Beyond
Concept: The Making and Unmaking of Non-cooperation

On the given political outline map of India, locate and label the following with the appropriate symbol:

The place where Gandhiji started satyagraha for the indigo planters.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [0.13] Mahatma Gandhi and the Nationalist Movement: Civil Disobedience and Beyond
Concept: The Making and Unmaking of Non-cooperation

What does Ashokan inscriptions tell about the Mauryas? Describe the limitations of the inscriptional evidences.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [1.01] Political and Economic History - How Inscriptions tell a story.
Concept: Asokan Inscription and Gupta Period Land Grant

How have the Prashastis drawn the factual information about the Gupta rulers?

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [1.01] Political and Economic History - How Inscriptions tell a story.
Concept: Asokan Inscription and Gupta Period Land Grant

Historians have used a variety of sources to reconstruct the history of the Mauryan Empire. State any four such sources.

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [1.01] Political and Economic History - How Inscriptions tell a story.
Concept: Interpretation of Inscriptions by Historians - Mauryan to the Gupta Period

Why are Buddhist Stupas said to be ''stories in stone” Explain

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [1.02] A History of Buddhism - Sanchi Stupa
Concept: Story of Discovery: Sanchi Stupa

How was the fate of Amravati Stupa different from the Sanchi Stupa?

Appears in 1 question paper
Chapter: [1.02] A History of Buddhism - Sanchi Stupa
Concept: Story of Discovery: Sanchi Stupa
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