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English Medium Class 10 - CBSE Important Questions for English - Language and Literature

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English - Language and Literature
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As Valli, make a diary entry sharing your joys and disappointments during the bus ride.

Appears in 6 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] From the Diary of Anne Frank
Concept: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Read the passage given below-

(1) Milkha Singh, also known as The Flying Sikh, was an Indian track and field sprinter who was introduced to the sport while serving in the Indian Army. He is the only athlete to win gold in 400 metres at the Asian Games as well as the Commonwealth Games. He also won gold medals in the 1958 and 1962 Asian Games. He represented India in the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome and the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. He was awarded the Padma Shri, India's fourth-highest civilian honour, in recognition of his sporting achievements.
(2) The race for which Singh is best remembered is his fourth-place finish in the 400 metres final at the 1960 Olympic Games. He led the race till the 200 m mark before easing off, allowing others to pass him. Singh's fourth-place time of 45.73 seconds was the Indian national record for almost 40 years.
(3) From beginning that saw him orphaned and displaced during the partition of India, Singh became a sporting icon in the country. In 2008, journalist Rohit Brijnath described Singh as "the finest athlete India has ever produced".
(4) He was disappointed with his debut performance at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics. "I returned to India, chastened by my poor performance in Melbourne. I had been so excited by the prospects of being part of the Indian Olympics team, but, hadn't realized how strong and professional the competition would be. My success in India had filled me with a false sense of pride and it was only when I was on the track that I saw how inconsequential my talents were when pitted against superbly fit and seasoned athletes. It was then that I understood what competition actually meant, and that if I wanted to succeed on the international arena, I must be prepared to test my mettle against the best athletes in the world."
(5) Then he decided to make sprinting the sole focus of his life.
"Running had thus become my God, my religion and my beloved".
"My life during those two years was governed by strict rules and regulations and a self-imposed penance. Every morning I would rise at the crack of dawn, get into my sports kit and dash off to the track, where I would run two or three miles cross-country in the company of my coach."
(6) On how he pushed himself through the tough days of vigorous training. "I practiced so strenuously that often I was drained of all energy, and there were times when I would increase my speed to such an extent that after my rounds, I would vomit blood or drop down unconscious through sheer exercise. My doctors and coaches warned me, asked me to slow down to maintain my health and equilibrium but my determination was too strong to give up. My only focus was to become the best athlete in the world. But then images of a packed stadium filled with cheering spectators, wildly applauding me as I crossed the finishing line, would flash across my mind and I would start again, encouraged by visions of victory."

Based on your reading answer any five questions from the six given below:   (5)

  1. What is Milkha Singh known as? What realization did Milkha Singh have when he was on the track during the Melbourne Olympics? 
  2. List any two of Milkha Singh's achievements.
  3. What strict rules and regulations did Milkha Singh follow?
  4. State two consequences of his hard and strenuous practice.
  5. What motivated Milkha Singh to become the best athlete in the world?
  6. Explain the phrase 'I would start again' in the last sentence.
Appears in 6 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Passage Comprehension

Read the following excerpt from a Case Study. J.K. Rowling - A Journey.

The story of Joanne Kathleen Rowling's near magical rise to fame is almost as well known as the characters she creates.

Rowling was constantly writing and telling stories to her younger sister Dianne. "The first story I ever wrote down was about a rabbit called Rabbit." Rowling said in an interview. "He got measles and was visited by his friends including a giant bee called Miss Bee. And ever since Rabbit and Miss Bee, I have always wanted to be a writer, though I rarely told anyone so.

However, my parents, both of whom come from impoverished backgrounds and neither of whom had been to college, took the view that my overactive imagination was an amusing personal quirk that would never pay a mortgage or secure a pension.

A writer from the age of six, with two unpublished novels in the drawer, she was stuck on a train when Harry walked into her mind fully formed. She spent the next five years constructing the plots of seven books, one for every year of his secondary school life.

Rowling says she started writing the first book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, in Portugal, where she was teaching English.

At first nobody wanted to publish Harry Potter. She was told that plot was too complex. Refusing to compromise, she found a publisher.

In 1997 Rowling received her first royalty cheque. By book three, she had sky rocketed to the top of the publishing world. A row of zeroes appeared on the author's bank balance and her life was turned upside down. Day and night she had journalists knocking on the unanswered door of her flat.

Rowling's quality control has become legendary, as her obsession with accuracy. She's thrilled with Stephen Fry's taped version of the books and outraged that an Italian dust jacket showed Harry minus his glasses. "Don't they understand that the glasses are the clue to his vulnerability."

Annual earnings of J.K. Rowlin from 2010 to 2019

On the basis of your understanding of the passage answer any five of the six questions given below.  (5)

  1. Explain J. K. Rowling's 'near magical rise to fame'.
  2. What reason did the publishers give for rejecting Rowling's book?
  3. What was the drawback of achieving fame?
  4. Why was Rowling outraged with the Italian dust jacket?
  5. Find a word in the last para that means the same as 'insecure/helpless'.
  6. According to the graph, how many years did it take Rowling to become very successful?
Appears in 6 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Passage Comprehension

Anne's mother never showed her interest in Anne Frank and remained indifferent to her. Describe the character of Anne's mother, Edith Frank in the light of this remark.

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] From the Diary of Anne Frank
Concept: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Attempt the following question in 100-120 words:

Bholi is a child different from others. This difference makes her an object of neglect and laughter. Elaborate.

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.09] Bholi
Concept: Bholi

Answer the following question  in 30-40 words :
How did Kisa Gotami realize that life and death is a normal process?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.1] The Sermon at Benares
Concept: The Sermon at Benares

Attempt the following question in 100-120 words:
The poet in the poem, 'For Anne Gregory' conveys that we should give importance to the inner beauty and not to the physical appearance. Elaborate with reference to the poem.

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.1] The Sermon at Benares
Concept: For Anne Gregory

Read the following passage carefully.
1. Few guessed that this quiet, parentless girl growing up in New York City would one day become the First Lady of the United States. Even fewer thought she would become an author and lecturer and a woman much admired and loved by people throughout the world.

2. Born Anna Eleanor Roosevelt in 1884 to wealthy, but troubled parents who both died while she was young, Roosevelt was cared for by her grandmother and sent to school in England. In 1905, she married her distant cousin, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. She and her husband had six children. Although they were wealthy, her life was not easy and she suffered several personal tragedies. Her second son died when he was a baby. In 1921, her strong athletic husband was stricken with polio, which left him physically disabled for life.

3. Eleanor Roosevelt was a remarkable woman who had great intelligence and tremendous strength of character. She never let things get her down. She nursed her husband back to good health and encouraged him to remain in politics. She then helped him to become Governor of New York, and in 1933, President of the United States.

4. While her husband was President, she took a great interest in all the affairs of the country. She became her husband's legs and eyes; she visited prisons and hospitals; she went down into mines, up scaffoldings, and into factories. Roosevelt was tireless and daring. During the depression, she travelled all over the country bringing goodwill, reassurance, and help to people without food and jobs. During World War II she visited American soldiers in camps all over the world. The United States had never known a First Lady like her.

5. Roosevelt also kept in touch with the American people through a daily newspaper column called 'My Day'. She broadcast on the radio and delivered lectures, all first for a First Lady.

1.1 On the basis of your understanding of the above passage answer the following questions: (any eight)

(a) How was Eleanor Roosevelt's personality in contrast to what she became?
(b) Apart from being the First Lady what else did she have to her credit?
(c) What challenges did she face in her personal life but remained unfazed?
(d) Eleanor was a strong woman who helped her husband become the President of America. How?
(e) What does the statement: 'she became her husband's legs and eyes' mean?
(f) What was her special contribution during the depression?
(g) How did she motivate soldiers during World War II?
(h) What did she do for the first time for a First Lady?
(i) What side of her personality is reflected in this passage?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Passage Comprehension

Read the passage given below carefully and answer the questions that follow.

1. Overpowering prey is a challenge for creatures that do not have limbs. Some species like Russell's viper inject poison. Some others opt for an alternative non-chemical method – rat snakes, for instance, catch and push their prey against the ground, while pythons use their muscle power to crush their prey to death. But snakes can't be neatly divided into poisonous and non-poisonous categories.

2. Even species listed as non-poisonous aren't completely free of poison. The common Sand Boa, for instance, produces secretions particularly poisonous to birds. So the species doesn't take any chance – it crushes its prey) and injects poison as an extra step.

3. Do vipers need poison powerful enough to kill hundreds of rats with just one drop? After all, they eat only one or two at a time.

4. While hunting animals try their worst to kill most efficiently, their prey uses any trick to avoid becoming a meal, such as developing immunity to poison.) For instance, Californian ground squirrels are resistant to Northern Pacific rattlesnake poison.

5. Competition with prey is not the only thing driving snakes to evolve more and more deadly poison. Snakes also struggle to avoid becoming prey themselves.

6. Some snake killers have partial immunity to poison. Famously, mongooses are highly resistant to cobra poison, and with their speed and agility, kill snakes fearlessly. It would be the death of cobras as a species if they didn't evolve a more deadly poison to stop mongooses.

7.  Poison has another important role. It's an extreme meat softener, specific enzymes break up the insides of the prey. Normally, a reptile depends on the sun's warm rays to aid digestion.

8. But I wonder if we cannot use venom in our favour. In remote parts of India, local hospitality often involves leather tough meat. I chew and chew until my jaws ache. If I spit it out or refuse, our hosts would be offended, I swallow like a python stuffing a deer down its throat and hope I don't choke. If only I had poison.

2.1 Read the questions given below and answer any four in 30-40 words each.
(a) Russell viper and rat snake have different methods to attack prey. How?
(b) How does Sand Boa kill its prey?
(c) There is a constant tussle between the hunting animal and its prey? Why?
(d) What makes mongoose a snake predator?
(e) What difficulty does the writer face when he is entertained in the remote parts of India?

2.2 On the basis of your reading of the above passage fill in any two of the following blanks.
i. Overpowering __________ is a challenge for creatures that do not have limbs.
a. a killer
b. humans
c. a python
d. prey
 
ii. Poison  ____________ meat.
a. enhances taste of
b. hardens
c. softens
d. breaks down

iii. Californian squirrels are  ______________  rattlesnake poison.
a. afraid of
b. helpless against
c. resistant to
d. indifferent to

2.3 Find words from the passage which mean the same as (any two)
a. Another (para 1)
a. Liquid substances released from glands (para 2)
c. Particular (para 7)
Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Passage Comprehension

Read of the following passage and answer the questions:

When I casually mentioned this to a friend, he casually replied that I had better get one in the Tigris marshes, for there they were as common as mosquitoes, and were often tamed by the Arabs. We were going to Basra to the Consulate-General to collect and answer our mail from Europe. At the Consulate-General we found that my friend's mail had arrived but that mine had not.

Questions :

(a) What was 'they'?

(b) Where could the author get 'one'?

(c) Find the exact word from the extract which means 'domesticated.'

(d) What did the author find at the Consulate-General?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Passage Comprehension

Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow:

(There is a languid, emerald sea,
where the sole inhabitant is me-
a mermaid drifting blissfully.)

Questions :

(a) Who does 'me' stand for?

(b) How does 'me' feel?

(c) Who is 'me' compared to?

(d) Which word in the extract means the opposite of 'sorrowfully'?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Unseen Poem Comprehension

Answer the following question in 200-250 words:
How did Kitty help Anne overcome her loneliness?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Reading Skills

Answer the following question in 200-250 words:
What is the main theme of 'The Diary of a Young Girl'?

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Reading Skills

Answer the following question in 200-250 words:
"The best and most beautiful things in the world can't be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart." Justify the famous quote of Helen Keller.

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Reading Skills

Answer the following question in 200-250 words:
Helen had a great love for animals and birds. Write about this aspect of her character.

Appears in 4 question papers
Chapter: [0.13] Reading Skills
Concept: Reading Skills

Describe in 120‒150 words Margot and Anne's relationship with their parents.

Appears in 3 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] From the Diary of Anne Frank
Concept: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Write a character sketch of Mrs. Van Dann in 120‒150 words.

Appears in 3 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] From the Diary of Anne Frank
Concept: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Attempt a character sketch of Peter in 120‒150 words.

Appears in 3 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] From the Diary of Anne Frank
Concept: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Answer the following question  in 30-40 words :

How can you say that Horace Danby was good and respectable but not completely honest?

Appears in 3 question papers
Chapter: [0.04] A Question of Trust
Concept: A Question of Trust

Answer the following question  in 30-40 words :

Why did Maddie write a note to Peggy and then tore it?

Appears in 3 question papers
Chapter: [0.05] The Hundred Dresses - I
Concept: The Hundred Dresses - I
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