What does the speaker usually do while lying in the bed? - English

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One Line Answer

What does the speaker usually do while lying in the bed?

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Solution

The speaker generally contemplated the idea of going inside the shed.

Concept: Reading
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Chapter 3.2: The Shed - Extra Questions

APPEARS IN

NCERT Class 7 English - Honeycomb
Chapter 3.2 The Shed
Extra Questions | Q 2

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Why did Einstein write a letter to Franklin Roosevelt?


Think about the Text

Discuss in pairs and answer question below in a short paragraph (30 − 40 words).

What two “important” and “earth-shaking” decisions did the doctor take while he was
looking into the mirror?


Take down the following scrambled version of a story, that your teacher will dictate to
you, with appropriate punctuation marks. Then, read the scrambled story carefully and try to rewrite it rearranging the incidents. A grasshopper, who was very hungry, saw her and said, “When did you get the corn? I am dying of hunger.” She wanted to dry them. It was a cold winter’s day, and an ant was bringing out some grains of corn from her home. She had gathered the corn in summer. “I was singing all day,” answered the grasshopper.
“If you sang all summer,” said the ant, “you can dance all winter.”
“What were you doing?” asked the ant again.
The grasshopper replied, “I was too busy.”
“I collected it in summer,” said the ant. “What were you doing in summer? Why did you not store some corn?”


Answer these question in one or two words or in short phrase.
Name five kinds of flutes.


Use the suffixes −ion or −tion to form nuns from the following verbs. Make the necessary changes in the spellings of the words.
Example:proclaim − proclamation

cremate ___ act ___ exhaust ___
invent ___ tempt ___ immigrate ___
direct ___ meditate ___ imagine ___
dislocate ___ associate ___ dedicate ___

 


Thinking about the Poem 

What do the last four lines of the poem mean to you?


Thinking about the Poem

Is this a true story? Which part of this poem do you feel is the most important?


How have the people of the community helped one another? What role do the women of Kalikuda play during these days?


Complete the following statement.

 When she finished college, Santosh had to write a letter of apology to her father because _________


Read a short story about an exemplary boss. 

Working 12 to 18 hours a day was not uncommon for scientists at the rocket launching station, Thumba. A group of such scientists was frustrated due to the work pressure and meeting their boss's demands; however, they were loyal to him. 
One day, a scientist gathered enough courage to go up to his boss and say, "Sir, I have promised my children that I will take them to the exhibition this evening. Therefore, I have to leave the office by 5.30 pm. Can I leave early today, Sir?" 
His boss replied, "Alright. You may leave early today." 
The scientist was happy for having received the permission and continued with his work. He stayed on to work after lunch, and, as always, got so engrossed in his work, that he peered at his watch only when he thought he was done. Unfortunately, it was past 08: 15 pm. 

With a jolt. he remembered his promise to his children. He looked for his boss who was not in his omee. Having told him just that morning. he wrapped up hia work and hurried home. 
A.P.J. he drove home, he felt very guilty for having let hla children down. When he reached, the chlldren were not at home. His wife was busy reading. He felt that initiating any conversation with her would only add fuel to fire, so he stayed quiet. 
Looking up at him, bis wife asked, "Do you want eomething hot to drink or would you like to have dinner right away?" 
The man could only aak, "Where are the children?" 
His wife said, "Don't you know? Your boss came here around quarter past five and took the children to the exhibition you had promised to take them to." 
He was surprised, but, it did not take him very long to guess what had happened. 
The boss who had granted him permission had observed him working very seriously well past 5.00 pm. He realized that the scientist would not leave the work half' done, but if he had promised his children visit to the exhibition, then they deserved it. So, he took the lead in taking them to the exhibition himself. 
The boss did not have to do it every time. But once it was done, loyalty was established. 
No wonder, all scientists at Thumba continued to work under this boss in spite of the great pressure. 
This boss was none other than Dr APJ Abdul Kalam. 

Following are eight incidents from the story but their order is mixed up. Put them in the right sequence.
(a) The scientist rushed home anticipating the disappointment of his children.
(b) Scientists were working for 12-18 hours at Thumba.
(c) The boss consented.
(d) Scientists had heavy work pressure but they were loyal.
(e) A scientist approached the boss for permission to leave at 5.30 pm to take his children to the exhibition.
(f) To his surprise, he learnt that his boss had kept his appointment for him.
(g) Suddenly, he remembered his promise to his children.
(h) The scientist became so engrossed in his work that he continued working till 8.15 pm.


Based on your reading of the story answer the following question by choosing the correct option:

The author says that Duke ‘knew his job’ The job was __________


On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following question
by ticking the correct choice.

'The Solitary Reaper' is a narrative poem set to music. This form of verse is called
a______.


JUST THINK
 In line 35, the poet has misspelt the word 'amalgum'. Why do you think she has
done that? Discuss.
(The teacher should point out the use of 'me' instead of 'my' and other linguistic
variations that make the poem enjoyable.)


In pairs, study the completed sentences in 5 above. You will notice that words like a little and much go with certain nouns. Are these nouns Countable [C] or Uncountable [U]?


Both, all, neither, none


Look at the passage below and study how the personal pronouns refer to different people.


Read the following story
There lived a wise old man in Purkul, Dehradun. The villagers looked up to him and approached him for all their problems. Three naughty boys Amar, Naveen and Praveen wanted to test the old man's wisdom.  One fine morning they caught a butterfly while playing in the garden. Amar had the
butterfly in his hand. He said, "We will go to the old man and ask him ifthe butterfly is dead or alive. If the old man says, 'the butterfly is dead', I will open my hands and release the butterfly. It will fly away." "If he says it is alive?" asked N aveen looking at Amar with a smirk. "I will crush the butterfly and show him the dead insect," said Amar. The three of them set forth with their wonderful plan.
Amar went to the old man and said, "Sir, the villagers say you can predict the future. Now tell us if the butterfly in my hand is dead or alive?" The old man looked at the three boys with a serene smile and said, "It is in your hands."


Read the information given below. 
Do you know that tigers are the biggest cats in the world? There are five different kinds or sub-species of tigers alive in the world today. Tigers are called Panthera tigris in Latin, Bagh in Hindi & Bengali, Kaduva in Malayalam & Pedda Puli in Telugu.
Total Population of Tigers in the world 

SUB SPECIES  COUNTRIES  ESTIMATED
 Minimum 
POPULATION 
   Maximum 
P.t. altaica  China 12 20
Amur Siberian, N. Korea  10 10
Manchurian  Russia  415 476
N .E. China Tiger       
TOTAL   437 506
Royal BengalTiger Bangladesh  300 460
P.t. tigris  Bhutan  80 460
  China  30 35
  India  2500 3800
  Nepal  150 250
TOTAL   3060 5005
P.t. corbetti  Cambodia  100 200
(Inda-Chinese Tiger)  China  30 40
  Laos     
  Malaysia  600 650
  Myanmar     
  Thailand  250 600
  Vietnam  200 300
TOTAL   1180 1790
P.t. sumatrae  Sumatra  400 500
(Sumatran Tiger)       
TOTAL   400 500
P. t. amoyensis  China  20 30
(South China Tiger)       
TOTAL   20 30
GRAND TOTAL   5097 7831

Extinct Species 
P.t. virgata      (Caspian Tiger) 
P. t. sondaica  (Javan Tiger )
P. t. balica      (Bali Tiger) 

Tiger in Trouble 
Since some tiger parts are used in traditional medicine, the tiger is in danger. Apart from its head being used as a trophy to decorate walls, tigers are also hunted for the following. 
Head : As a trophy on the wall. 
Brain: To cure laziness and pimples. 
Teeth: For rabies, asthma and sores. 
Blood: For strengthening the constitution and will power. 
Fat: For vomiting, dog bites, bleeding haemorrhoids and scalp ailments in children. 
Skin: To treat mental illness and to make fur coats. 
Whiskers: For toothache. 


Working in groups of four, create your own mystery story. You may use the following chart to plan your story. 

Title of 'Solve-it Story'   
Main Character   
Secondary character   
Setting (where and when)   
Problem   
Main events   
Climax   
Solution   

Here is a newspaper report of a young girl who went back in time to see how her home town looked seventy years ago.

Dehra Times

Purkul, 7 July, 2015

It is reported that Kareena, a twelve year old girl living in Purkul, went back in time using a time machine.

Seventy years ago her home town was an ideal place to live in. Her home town had not been invaded by the marvels of technology. Industries had not been set up then, so the air was not polluted. She could see children playing in the garden. Some children were listening to the stories told by their grandmothers. Happiness and contentment prevailed everywhere.

In the newspaper report above, the focus is on the changes as observed by Kareena.
  1. Kareena’s hometown had not been invaded by the marvels of technology.
  2. Industries had not been set up.
  3. The air was not polluted.
  4. Some children were listening to stories told to them by their grandmothers.

What does he plant who plants a tree? a
He plants a friend of sun and sky;b
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high;
He plants a home to heaven anigh;
For song and mother-croon of bird
In hushed and happy twilight heard____
The treble of heaven's harmony_____
These things he plants who plants a tree.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow:

What is meant by ‘the treble of heaven’s harmony’?

What does he plant who plants a tree? a
He plants a friend of sun and sky;b
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high;
He plants a home to heaven anigh;
For song and mother-croon of bird
In hushed and happy twilight heard____
The treble of heaven's harmony_____
These things he plants who plants a tree.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow:

Pick out some figures of speech.

What does he plant who plants a tree? a
He plants a friend of sun and sky;b
He plants the flag of breezes free;
The shaft of beauty, towering high;
He plants a home to heaven anigh;
For song and mother-croon of bird
In hushed and happy twilight heard____
The treble of heaven's harmony_____
These things he plants who plants a tree.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow:

Which literary device has been used in the line: ‘In hushed and happy twilight heard’ ?

What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants, in sap and leaf and wood,
In love of home and loyalty
And far-cast thought of civic good____
His blessing on the neighbourhood,
Who in the hollow of his hand
Holds all the growth of all our land____
A nation's growth from sea to sea
Stirs in his heart who plants a tree.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow:

Does the man plant a tree because of his love of society and his nation?


What does he plant who plants a tree?
He plants, in sap and leaf and wood,
In love of home and loyalty
And far-cast thought of civic good____
His blessing on the neighbourhood,
Who in the hollow of his hand
Holds all the growth of all our land____
A nation's growth from sea to sea
Stirs in his heart who plants a tree.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow:

How is the man holding the blessing on his neighborhood in his hand?


The black man's face bespoke revenge
As the fire passed from his sight.
For all he saw in his stick of wood
Was a chance to spite the white.

The last man of this forlorn group
Did nought except for gain.
Giving only to those who gave
Was how he played the game.

Their logs held tight in death's still hands
Was proof of human sin.
They didn't die from the cold without
They died from the cold within.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow.

Discuss personification as used by the poet.


Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in springhtly dance.

Read the lines given above and answer the question that follow.

How many did the poet see at a glance?


The athletes had come from all over the country
To run for the gold, for the silver and bronze
Many weeks and months of training
All coming down to these games.
The spectators gathered around the old field
To cheer on all the young women and men
The final event of the day was approaching
Excitement grew high to begin.

Read the lines given above and answer the following question:

Were the contestants well prepared for the event? Pick the line that illustrates this.


“If you are rested I would go,” I urged. “Get up and try to walk now.”
“Thank you,” he said and got to his feet, swayed from side to side and then sat down backwards in the dust.
“I was taking care of animals,” he said dully, but no longer to me. “I was only taking care of animals.”
There was nothing to do about him. It was Easter Sunday and the Fascists were advancing toward the Ebro. It was a grey overcast day with a low ceiling so their planes were not up. That and the fact that cats know how to look after themselves was all the good luck that the old man would ever have.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

Explain the line, ‘There was nothing to do about him.’


Mr. Oliver, an Anglo-Indian teacher, was returning to his school late one night on the outskirts of the hill station of Shimla. The school was conducted on English public school lines and the boys – most of them from well-to-do Indian families – wore blazers, caps and ties. “Life” magazine, in a feature on India, had once called this school the Eton of the East.

Mr. Oliver had been teaching in this school for several years. He’s no longer there. The Shimla Bazaar, with its cinemas and restaurants, was about two miles from the school; and Mr. Oliver, a bachelor, usually strolled into the town in the evening returning after dark, when he would take short cut through a pine forest.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

Why was the school where Mr Oliver worked called the Eton of the East?


Its a cruel thing to leave her so.”

“Then take her to the poorhouse: she’ll have to go there,” answered the blacksmith’s wife, springing away, and leaving Joe behind.

For a little while the man stood with a puzzled air; then he turned back, and went into the hovel again. Maggie with painful effort, had raised herself to an upright position and was sitting on the bed, straining her eyes upon the door out of which all had just departed, A vague terror had come into her thin white face.

“O, Mr. Thompson!” she cried out, catching her suspended breath, “don’t leave me here all alone!”           ,

Though rough in exterior, Joe Thompson, the wheelwright, had a heart, and it was very tender in some places. He liked children, and was pleased to have them come to his shop, where sleds and wagons were made or mended for the village lads without a draft on their hoarded sixpences.

“No, dear,” he answered, in a kind voice, going to the bed, and stooping down over the child, “You she’n’t be left here alone.” Then he wrapped her with the gentleness almost of a woman, in the clean bedclothes which some neighbor had brought; and, lifting her in his strong arms, bore her out into the air and across the field that lay between the hovel and his home.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

What idea do we get of the character of Mr Thompson?


From the day, perhaps a hundred years ago when he sun had hatched him in a sandbank, and he had broken his shell, and got his head out and looked around, ready to snap at anything, before he was even fully hatched-from that day, when he had at once made for the water, ready to fend for himself immediately, he had lived by his brainless craft and ferocity. Escaping the birds of prey and the great carnivorous fishes that eat baby crocodiles, he has prospered, catching all the food he needed, and storing it till putrid in holes in the bank. Tepid water to live in and plenty of rotted food grew him to his great length. Now nothing could pierce the inch-?thick armoured hide. Not even rifle bullets,

which would bounce off. Only the eyes and the soft underarms offered a place. He lived well in the river, sunning himself sometimes with other crocodiles-muggers, as well as the long-? snouted fish-?eating gharials-on warm rocks and sandbanks where the sun dried the clay on them quite white, and where they could plop off into the water in a moment if alarmed. The big crocodile fed mostly on fish, but also on deer and monkeys come to drink, perhaps a duck or two.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

How old was the crocodile? How big?


Then there it lay in her wet palm, perfect, even pierced ready for use, with the sunset shuffled about inside it like gold—?dust. All her heart went up in flames of joy. After a bit she twisted it into the top of her skirt against her tummy so she would know if it burst through the poor cloth and fell. Then she picked up her fork and sickle and the heavy grass and set off home. Ai! Ai! What a day! Her barefeet smudged out the wriggle— ?mark of snakes in the dust; there was the thin singing of malaria mosquitoes among the trees now; and this track was much used at night by a morose old makna elephant—the Tuskless One; but Sibia was not thinking of any of them. The stars came out: she did not notice. On the way back she met her mother, out of breath, come to look for her, and scolding. “I did not see till I was home, that you were not there. I thought something must have happened to you.” And Sibia, bursting with her story, cried “Something did). I found a blue bead for my necklace, look!”

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

Is the Ending Appropriate?


It was the summer of 1936. The Olympic Games were being held in Berlin. Because Adolf Hitler childishly insisted that his performers were members of a “master race,” nationalistic feelings were at an all-time high.

I wasn’t too worried about all this. I’d trained, sweated and disciplined myself for six years, with the Games in mind. While I was going over on the boat, all I could think about was taking home one or two of those gold medals. I had my eyes especially on the running broad jump. A year before, as a sophomore at the Ohio State, I’d set the world’s record of 26 feet 8 1/4 inches. Nearly everyone expected me to win this event.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

Why does Jesse Owens dismiss the claim of Hitler as childish?


I was in for a surprise. When the time came for the broad-jump trials, I was startled to see a tall boy hitting the pit at almost 26 feet on his practice leaps! He turned out to be a German named Luz Long. 1 was told that Hitler hoped to win the jump with him. I guessed that if Long won, it would add some new support to the Nazis’ “master race” (Aryan superiority) theory. After all, I am a Negro. Angr about Hitler’s ways, 1 determined to go out there and really show Der Fuhrer and his master race who was superior and who wasn’t. An angry athlete is an athlete who will make mistakes, as any coach will tell you. I was no exception. On the first of my three qualifying jumps, I leaped from several inches beyond the takeoff board for a foul. On the second jump, I fouled even worse. “Did I come 3,000 miles for this?” I thought bitterly. “To foul out of the trials and make a fool of myself ?” Walking a few yards from the pit, 1 kicked disgustedly at the dirt.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

“Did I come all the way from America for this?” I thought bitterly. “To foul out of the trials and make a fool of myself?” What does this show?


Margot stood alone. She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and the yellow from her hair. She was an old photograph dusted from an album, whitened away, and if she spoke at all her voice would be a ghost. Now she stood, separate, staring at the rain and the loud wet world beyond the huge glass. “What’re you looking at ?” said William. Margot said nothing. “Speak when you’re spoken to.” He gave her a shove. But she did not move; rather she let herself be moved only by him and nothing else. They edged away from her, they would not look at her. She felt them go away. And this was because she would play no games with them in the echoing tunnels of the underground city. If they tagged her and ran, she stood blinking after them and did not follow. When the class sang songs about happiness and life and games her lips barely moved. Only when they sang about the sun and the summer did her lips move as she watched the drenched windows.

Read the extract given below and answer the question that follow.

What was the reaction of the children towards Margot?


Given below are four words and phrases. Find the words which have a similar meaning in the passage:
(1) Coming near 
( 2 ) Disappeared suddenly
(3) Awakening from sleep
(4) Moved slowly and gradually


I could hear the squeaking that heralded the evening arrival of the bats. I listened to the noises of the approaching night. Every day my hearing grew sharper. I was learning to filter out whatever I did not need to listen to, and giving no sign that I could hear everything that went on in the house.

I could not sleep. The air was heavy and still, the moon hidden behind thick banks of cloud. Lord Otori was sound asleep. I did not want to leave the house I'd come to love so much, but I seemed to be bringing nothing but trouble to it. Perhaps it would be better for everyone if I just vanished in the night.    [5]

 
Now I heard the hiss of hot water as the bath was prepared, the clatter of dishes from the kitchen, the sliding sigh of the cook's knife, a dog barking two streets away, and the sounds of feet on the wooden bridges on the canals. I knew the sounds of the house, day and night, in the sunshine and under the rain. This evening I realized I was always listening for something more. I was waiting too. For what?        [10]


I began to wonder if I could get out of the house without setting the dogs barking and arousing the guards. I started consciously listening to the dogs. Usually, I heard them bark on and off throughout the night, but I'd learned to distinguish their barks and to ignore them. I set my ears for them but heard nothing. Then I started listening for the guards: the sound of a foot on stone or a whispered conversation. Nothing. Sounds that should have been there been missing from the night's familiar web.        [20]


Now I was wide-awake, straining my ears to hear. There came the slightest of sounds, hardly more than a tremor, between the window and the ground.    


For a moment I thought it was the earth-shaking, as it so often did. Another tiny tremble followed, then another. Someone was climbing up the side of the house        [25]


My first instinct was to yell out, but cunning took over. I rose from the mattress and crept silently to Lord Otori's side. I knelt beside him and whispered in his ear, "Lord Otori, someone is, outside."      [30]


He woke instantly and then reached for the sword and knife that lay beside him. I gestured to the window. The faint tremor came again.


Lord Otori passed the knife to me and stepped to the wall. I moved to the other side of the window. We waited for the assassin to climb in.


Step by step he came up the wall, stealthy and unhurried as if he had all the time in the world. We waited for him with the same patience.    [35]

He paused on the sill to take out the knife he planned to use on us and then stepped inside. Lord Otori took him in a stranglehold. The intruder wriggled backwards. I leaped at him, and the three of us fell into the garden like a flurry of fighting cats.  [40]


The man fell first, across the stream, striking his head on a boulder. Lord Otori landed on his feet. My fall was broken by one of the shrubs. The intruder groaned, tried to rise, but slipped back into the water.


"Get a light," Lord Otori said.


I ran to the house, took a light that still burned in one of the candle stands and carried it back to the garden.    [45]


The assassin had died without regaining consciousness. It turned out he had a poison pellet in his mouth and had crushed it as he tell. He was dressed in black, with no marking on his clothes. I held the light over him. There was nothing to tell us who he was.    [50]

 

(i) Given below are four words and phrases. Find the words which have a similar meaning in the passage:
(1) Coming near 
( 2 ) Disappeared suddenly
(3) Awakening from sleep
(4) Moved slowly and gradually 

(ii) For each of the words given below, write a sentence of at least ten words using the same word unchanged in form, but with a different  meaning from that which it carries in the passage:
(1) Bats ( line 1 )
( 2 ) Sign ( line 4 )
( 3 ) Banks (  line 6 )
( 4 )  Back ( line 43 )


Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
Richard Parker was so named because of a clerical error.
A panther was terrorizing the Khulna district of Bangladesh, just outside the Sundarbans. It had recently carried off a little girl. She was the seventh person killed in two months by the animal. And it was growing bolder. The previous victim was a man who had been attacked in broad daylight in his field. The beast dragged him off into the forest, and his corpse was later found hanging from a tree. The villagers kept a watch nearby that night, hoping to surprise the panther and kill it, but it never appeared.
The Forest Department hired a professional hunter. He set up a small, hidden platform in a free near a river where two of the attacks had taken place. A goat was tied to a stake on the river’s bank. The hunter waited several nights. He assumed the panther would be an old, wasted male with worn teeth, incapable of catching anything more difficult than a human. But it was a sleek tiger that stepped into the open one night: a female with a single cub. The goat bleated. Oddly, the cub, who looked to be about three months old, paid little attention to the goat. It raced to the water’s edge, where it drank eagerly. Its mother followed it. Of hunger and thirst, thirst is the greater urge. Only once the tiger had quenched her thirst did she turn to the goat to satisfy her hunger.
The hunter had two rifles with him: one with real bullets, the other with immobilizing darts. This animal was not the man-eater, but so close to human habitation she might pose a threat to the villagers, especially as she was with cub. He picked up the gun with the darts. He fired as the tiger was about to attack the goat. The tiger reared up and snarled and raced away. But immobilizing darts don’t bring on sleep gently—they knock the creature out without warning. A burst of activity on the animal’s part makes it act all the faster. The hunter called his assistants on the radio. They found the tiger about two hundred yards from the river. She was still conscious. Her back legs had given way and her balance on her front legs was shaky. When the men got close, she tried to get away but could not manage it. She turned on them, lifting a paw that was meant to kill. It only made her lose her balance. She collapsed and the Pondicherry Zoo had two new tigers. The cub was found in a bush close by, meowing with fear.
The hunter, whose name was Richard Parker, picked it up with his bare hands and, remembering how it had rushed to drink in the river, named it Thirsty. But the shipping clerk at the Howrah train station was evidently a man both confused and diligent. All the papers received with the cub clearly stated that its name was Richard Parker, that the hunter’s first name was Thirsty add that his family name was None Given. Richard Parker’s name stuck. I don’t know if the hunter was ever called Thirsty None Given!

(a) Give the meaning of each of the following words as used in the passage.
One word answers ob short phrases will be accepted.

  1. corpse (line 6)
  2. quenched (line 16)
  3. reared (line 20)

(b) Answer the following questions briefly in your own words.

  1. Why does the author say that the panther ‘was getting bolder’? 
  2. Why did the Forest Department hire a professional hunter? 
  3. What did the hunter expect to encounter? What did he actually encounter? 
  4. What did the tiger do before turning to attack the goat? Why did it do that? 
  5. Why did the hunter decide to shoot the tiger though he knew it was not the man-eater?
  6. What name did the hunter give to the cub? Why? 

(c)

(i) In not more than 60 words narrrate how the hunter and his assistants captured the tiger and her cub. 
(ii) Give a suitable title to your summary in 3(c). Give a reason to justify your choice. 


 Which race does De Levis mention later? What is his opinion about society? 


 Who was the first person to feature in 'his' assignment? What did 'he' say about him? 


Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

There’s nobody on the house-tops now …..
Just a palsied few at the windows set;
For the best of the sight is, all allow,
At the Shambles’ Gate …… or, better yet,
By the very scaffold’s foot, I trow.
–  The Patriot, Robert Browning

(i) Who is the speaker? Where is he being taken? Why? 

(ii) Describe the scene when he had walked down the same street a year ago. 

(iii) Where does the speaker think all the people had gathered that day? Why does he think so? 

(iv) Describe the speaker's physical condition.

(v) What is the central message of the poem? Does the poem and on a note of hope or despair? Give one reason for your answer.


With references to George Orwell's Tlie Animd Fann', answer the following questions : 

(i) Who wrote the poem 'Comrade Napoleon'? 
How did Napoleon show his approval of the poem?

(ii) What precautions were taken to ensure Napoleon'? 

(iii) What single commandment replaced the seven commandments on Aninzal Farin? Mention some of the changes that the animals noticed in the behavior of the pigs after the new, commandment had been put up. 


Discuss the following topic in groups.

Why, in your opinion, did the man set the doves free?


Read the following.

A group of children in your class are going to live in a hostel.

•They have been asked to choose a person in the group to share a room with.

•They are asking each other questions to decide who they would like to share a room with. Ask one another questions about likes/dislikes/preferences/hobbies/personal characteristics.

Use the following questions and sentence openings.

(i) What do you enjoy doing after school?

I enjoy...

(ii) What do you like in general?

I like...

(iii) Do you play any game?

I don’t like...

(iv) Would you mind if I listened to music after dinner?

I wouldn’t...

(v) Will it be all right if I...?

It’s fine with me...

(vi) Is there anything you dislike, particularly? Well, I can’t share...

(vii) Do you like to attend parties?

Oh, I...

(viii) Would you say you are...?

I think...


Describe Mr Wonka.


Where did the author planned to do alongwith his friend?


How old were Kari (the elephant) and the narrator?


What are the changes the cricket bat has undergone with time?


What is in general, the relationship between a mongoose and a snake?


Give a character sketch of the shepherd. What qualities pleased the king?


How did Ray communicate with him?


What do you think the man said to his friend who waited at the door?


Ray was not a pawnbroker. Why then did he lend money to people in exchange for their old watches and clocks?


“The watch was nothing special and yet had great powers.” In what sense did it have ‘great powers’?


Who were the two last-minute shoppers to Ray’s shop?


What was the problem of the two shoppers? What were they going to try?


Why did Swami Haridas say Tansen was ‘talented’?


Why was the crocodile’s wife annoyed with her husband one day?


Who made the pact with the Sun and why? How did the pact prove fruitful?


Why and when did Dad say the following?

Fall?


The little elf was a nag. How did it tell Patrick’s health?


Read these lines from the poem:
Then soars like a ship
With only a sail

The movement of the tailless kite is compared to a ship with a sail. This is called a simile. Can you suggest what or who the following actions may be compared to?

He runs like _______________

He eats like ________________

She sings like _____________

It shines like _______________

It flies like _________________


What did the author point out about the children in the playground?


Multiple Choice Question:
Which one of the following mistakes the child does not make?


Who is the speaker in the poem?


What activities are dear to little children? Who does the child envy and why in the poem Vocation?


Why does the rebel demand for the rain when everybody is praising the sun?


Write ‘True’ or ‘False’ against each of the following sentences.

Gopal was too poor to afford decent clothes.________


  • Notice the way Mr Gessler speaks English. His English is influenced by his mother tongue. He speaks English with an accent.
  • When Mr Gessler speaks, p, t, k, sound like b,d,g. Can you say these words as Mr Gessler would say them?
    It comes and never stops. Does it bother me? Not at all. Ask my brother, please.

Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

Iris: Of her society
Be not afraid. I met her deity
Cutting the clouds towards Paphos, and her son
Dove-drawn with her.

Whom does Iris refer to as ‘her’?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

Iris: Of her society
Be not afraid. I met her deity
Cutting the clouds towards Paphos, and her son
Dove-drawn with her.

Why was the person addressed afraid of “her”?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

Iris: Of her society
Be not afraid. I met her deity
Cutting the clouds towards Paphos, and her son
Dove-drawn with her.

What is meant by “dove drawn”?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

“But my darling, if you love me,” thought Miss Meadows, “I don’t
Mind how much it is. Love me as little as you like.”

What had the “darling” informed Miss Meadows?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

“But my darling, if you love me,” thought Miss Meadows, “I don’t
Mind how much it is. Love me as little as you like.”

Where was Miss Meadows as she thought these thoughts?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

“But my darling, if you love me,” thought Miss Meadows, “I don’t
Mind how much it is. Love me as little as you like.”

What was the effect of Basil’s letter on Miss Meadows?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Agean…

Who is Sophocles?


Read the lines given below and answer the following question:

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Agean…

What did he hear on the Agean?


Answer the following question.

Who advised Golu to go to the Limpopo River?


Read the passage given below and answer the questions (i), (ii) and (iii) that follow:

(1) Something happens to cats after we have enjoyed a delicious meal. Call it a feline sugar hit or a rush of good feeling. Abandoning our usually sedentary nature, we transform into crazy beasts who thunder down corridors, spring from one piece of furniture to another, or pounce from behind half-closed doors to attack the shoelaces of unsuspecting passersby. It is as though we are temporarily possessed.

(2) That, at least, is my excuse, dear reader - and the only explanation I can offer for my entirely unplanned global TV debut.

(3) To be fair, I had no way of knowing that my master was receiving visitors that particular afternoon. Nor that he was being interviewed live, let alone by one of America’s most famous journalists.

(4) All I knew was that, a few minutes after gorging myself on a favourite treat of creamy pudding, I felt that sudden, primal explosion of energy. I made my way back to the suite of rooms that I shared with my master and felt an overpowering compulsion to do something completely mad. I wanted to run like a furious jungle cat, at that particular moment.

(5) Bursting through the door of the room in which my master received visitors, I tore up the carpet as I raced towards the sofa opposite where he was sitting. I ripped its fabric as I scrambled up its side like a savage creature clawing its way up a perilous cliff. Then with a final, frenzied burst, I launched myself off one arm of the sofa, leaping towards the other.

(6) It was only at this point that I realised the sofa was occupied by the journalist. She was halfway through a sentence, and my abrupt appearance caught my master's guest completely by surprise.

(7) You know, when something truly unexpected happens, time can seem to slow down. Well, that’s how it was. As I flew past the woman's face, her expression turned from one of calm engagement to that of total surprise.

(8) I As she pushed back in her seat to avoid me, the shock on her face could not have been more evident.

(9) But, dear reader, she was not more shaken than me. I had not been expecting anyone on the sofa, let alone a TV celebrity, nor one who was mid-interview. As I headed towards the opposite end of the sofa, for the first time I observed the lighting, the cameras and the crew watching the action from the shadows. By the time I landed on the other arm of the sofa, all the energy that had propelled me was gone.

(10) I was, no longer, a furious jungle cat.

(11) The journalist looked at me. I looked at her. Both of us were taking in what had just happened. I was also conscious of the cameras still rolling as well as many pairs of eyes watching me at that moment. My moment of global glory.

Adapted from: The Dalai Lama's Cat Omnibus
By David Michie

 (i) (a) Given below are three words and phrases. Find the words which have a similar meaning in the passage: [3]

(1) inactive

(2) eating in a greedy manner

(3) dangerous

(b) For each of the words given below, write a sentence of at least ten words using the same word unchanged in form, but with a different meaning from that which it carries in the passage: [3]

(1) thunder (line 3)

(2) spring (line 3)

(3) past (line 26)

(ii) Answer the following questions in your own words as briefly as possible:

(a) What is the usual nature of the narrator's kind? How is it differently presented in the passage? [2]

(b) What did the 'favourite treat of creamy pudding' do to the narrator? [2]

(c) Describe the actions of the narrator after bursting into the visitors' room. [2]

(d) How did the journalist react when the narrator 'flew past' her face? [2]

(iii) Summarise how the narrator became a global celebrity (paragraphs 4 to 11). You are required to write the summary in the form of a connected passage in about 100 words. Failure to keep within the word limit will be penalised. [6]


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