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Cork Cambium Forms Tissues that Form the Cork. Do You Agree with this Statement? Explain - Biology

Cork cambium forms tissues that form the cork. Do you agree with this statement? Explain.

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Solution

When secondary growth occurs in the dicot stem and root, the epidermal layer gets broken. There is a need to replace the outer epidermal cells for providing protection to the stem and root from infections. Therefore, the cork cambium develops from the cortical region. It is also known as phellogen and is composed of thin-walled rectangular cells. It cuts off cells toward both sides. The cells on the outer side get differentiated into the cork or phellem, while the cells on the inside give rise to the secondary cortex or phelloderm. The cork is impervious to water, but allows gaseous exchange through the lenticels. Phellogen, phellem, and phelloderm together constitute the periderm.

Concept: Secondary Growth - Cork Cambium
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APPEARS IN

NCERT Class 11 Biology Textbook
Chapter 6 Anatomy of Flowering Plants
Q 2 | Page 99
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