CBSE Class 9CBSE
Share
Notifications

View all notifications

Infectious Diseases - Organ-specific and Tissue-specific Manifestations

Login
Create free account


      Forgot password?

notes

ORGAN-SPECIFIC AND TISSUE SPECIFIC MANIFESTATIONS:

  • Different species of microbes seem to have evolved to home in on different parts of the body. In part, this selection is connected to their point of entry. If they enter from the air via the nose, they are likely to go to the lungs. This is seen in the bacteria causing tuberculosis. If they enter through the mouth, they can stay in the gut lining like typhoid causing bacteria. Or they can go to the liver, like the viruses that cause jaundice. But this needn’t always be the case. An infection like HIV, that comes into the body via the sexual organs, will spread to lymph nodes all over the body. Malaria-causing microbes, entering through a mosquito bite, will go to the liver, and then to the red blood cells. The virus causing Japanese encephalitis, or brain fever, will similarly enter through a mosquito bite. But it goes on to infect the brain. The signs and symptoms of a disease will thus depend on the tissue or organ which the microbe targets. If the lungs are the targets, then symptoms will be cough and breathlessness. If the liver is targeted, there will be jaundice. If the brain is the target, we will observe headaches, vomiting, fits or unconsciousness. We can imagine what the symptoms and signs of an infection will be if we know what the target tissue or organ is, and the functions that are carried out by this tissue or organ.
  • In addition to these tissue-specific effects of infectious disease, there will be other common effects too. Most of these common effects depend on the fact that the body’s immune system is activated in response to infection. An active immune system recruits many cells to the affected tissue to kill off the disease-causing microbes. This recruitment process is called inflammation. As a part of this process, there are local effects such as swelling and pain, and general effects such as fever. In some cases, the tissue-specificity of the infection leads to very general-seeming effects. For example, in HIV infection, the virus goes to the immune system and damages its function. Thus, many of the effects of HIV-AIDS are because the body can no longer fight off the many minor infections that we face everyday. Instead, every small cold can become pneumonia. Similarly, a minor gut infection can produce major diarrhoea with blood loss. Ultimately, it is these other infections that kill people suffering from HIV-AIDS. It is also important to remember that the severity of disease manifestations depend on the number of microbes in the body. If the number of microbes is very small, the disease manifestations may be minor or unnoticed. But if the number is of the same microbe large, the disease can be severe enough to be life threatening. The immune system is a major factor that determines the number of microbes surviving in the body.
  • Such disease-causing microbes can spread through the air. This occurs through the little droplets thrown out by an infected person who sneezes or coughs. Someone standing close by can breathe in these droplets, and the microbes get a chance to start a new infection. Examples of such diseases spread through the air are the common cold, pneumonia and tuberculosis. We all have had the experience of sitting near someone suffering from a cold and catching it ourselves. Obviously, the more crowded our living conditions are, the more likely it is that such airborne diseases will spread.
  • If we understand the characteristics we can treat the diseases caused by them in a better way. We can find out which medicine would work on which infectious agent. Some common characteristics of infectious agents are:
  • We live in an environment that is full of many other creatures apart from us. It is inevitable that many diseases will be transmitted by other animals. These animals carry the infecting agents from a sick person.
  • Viruses live inside the host body
  • Bacteria do not generally live inside the host body
  • Virus, bacteria and fungi multiply quickly
  • Worms do not multiply quickly
  • Antibiotics are generally used to block the growth of bacteria. The bacteria cells grow by creating a cell wall that protects them. Penicillin is an antibiotic that prevents the growth of the cell wall and hence bacteria die easily. Penicillin is used for fighting against different kinds of bacteria.
S
View in app×